“On the Trail of Bigfoot: The Discovery” Reviewed

A less classy outfit might open this film with “Are you ready for some Bigfoot?”, but Seth Breedlove and his experienced Small Town Monsters crew know you don’t watch their cryptid documentaries for hype – you want results. You won’t disappointed with “On the Trail of Bigfoot: The Discovery” – it opens with aerial views of the dense, foggy woodlands in the state of Washington that are America’s equivalent of a tropical rainforest. As you wonder how anyone could discover anything here, “On the Trail of Bigfoot: The Discovery” tells the story of how one dedicated Bigfoot research team found perhaps the best evidence of the existence of Sasquatch in these woods – evidence that could only have been made by a large, thinking creature with opposable thumbs.

Director, writer and narrator Seth Breedlove faces an immediate challenge he doesn’t normally encounter in his previous Small Town Monsters documentaries – no small towns. This film takes place on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula and the Native American villages and mining towns are gone, so the film tells some historical accounts of early Sasquatch encounters in the area – some of them violent and fatal. These include an interesting feature prevalent in this film – recordings of strange vocalizations, knocks and other sounds from this area which can’t be explained by the known fauna that live in these woods. The history and the recordings are a good introduction to Breedlove’s hosts and tour guides for this adventure – the members of the Olympic Project.

As its website states, the Olympic Project is an association of dedicated researchers, investigators, biologists and trackers dedicated to collecting information and empirical evidence on Bigfoot. They describe to Breedlove and his team why they believe the Olympic Peninsula is uniquely suited as a Sasquatch habitat, including some of their own personal encounters, and then take him step by step from their first contact in 2016 by a land surveyor who discovered something unusual, to their own first encounter with the evidence, to their discovery of more, and  finally through their attempts to document and preserve the location. Their insights on this remote location, with its abundance of huckleberries and other medicinal and nourishing foods, and the strategic placement of the evidence that indicates both intelligence and dexterity are truly enlightening. Watching the Olympic Project team demonstrate their extensive array of equipment and their investigation and documentation techniques are an excellent guide for other Bigfoot seekers.

In the end, Seth Breedlove and his own team members take off their documentarian hats and become viewers trying to wrap their heads around what they’ve just seen and heard. Is this truly a big ‘discovery’? If so, what does it mean? What’s next? As usual, Small Town Monsters leaves the viewer with much to think about and anxiously awaiting its next adventure.

“On the Trail of Bigfoot: The Discovery” will be released on November 2, 2021, and can be pre-ordered or purchased at Small Town Monsters.

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