Kraken’s Love Life, Deadly Starlinks, Doomsday Glacier and More Mysterious News Briefly — August 23, 2021

Billionaire tech entrepreneur Jared Isaacman bought a ticket on an upcoming privately commissioned SpaceX mission so he can take 70 pounds of hops that that he will then sell back on Earth to a brewery for making space beer. The line will be long if space beer makes you weightless.

A new study of the so-called Doomsday Glacier (Thwaites Glacier) beneath West Antarctica found it’s melting at a record rate not just because of climate but also because the relatively thin crust beneath it exposes it to higher geothermal temperatures than expected. “I know how you feel,” said the cheddar in a grilled cheese sandwich.

Elon Musk revealed Tesla is working on a humanoid robot to perform menial tasks that humans won’t do and he promised that won’t attempt to kill anyone. Check again when it has to clean a bar men’s room.

Astronomers have picked up never-before-detected radio waves from the Large Magellanic Cloud – the satellite dwarf spiral galaxy which borders the Milky Way – which will help give them a clearer picture of how it and other galaxies and their stars developed and evolved throughout time. It’s not aliens, but they’re still hoping to get a cable TV show.

Using data from the Socrates (Satellite Orbital Conjunction Reports Assessing Threatening Encounters in Space ) database, Europe’s leading expert on space debris says SpaceX’s Starlink satellites are involved in about 1,600 near misses with each other every week, and 500 near misses of collisions with other spacecraft weekly. It’s no wonder other satellites refer to Starlinks as ‘Florida drivers in space’.

The US Army unveiled the High-Altitude Extended-Range Long Endurance Intelligence Observation system (HELEIOS) — a network of balloons that will hover at 60,000+ feet off the ground for the purpose of monitoring, intercepting, and jamming enemy communications from satellites. This is the scariest use of balloons since the first clown figured out how to make a balloon poodle.

Scientists at Tel Aviv University successfully 3D-printed out a living, “viable” glioblastoma brain cancer tumor – complete with brain-like material and artificial blood vessels — for the sole purpose of learning how to kill it with experimental drugs. What would Tesla’s robot have to say about this? (See above)

Scientists in Canada and Argentina used CT scans to digitally reconstruct the brain, inner ear, and surrounding braincase of two well-preserved specimens of Daspletosaurus, a T. rex ancestor, and found their large brains showed much more variety than they expected. Interesting, but what did dinosaurs have to think about besides eating, sleeping, and wondering what that bright growing light in the sky is?

Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have developed Neurophotonic Solution-dispersible Wireless Activity Reporter for Massively Multiplexed Measurements (Neuro-SWARM3), nanoparticles  that convert the brain’s electrical impulses to infrared light that can be picked up by sensors outside the body that don’t require a hardwired connection – in other words, injectable brain monitors that don’t require surgery or implants. They’re still in the prototype stage … or are they?

A female giant squid caught off the coast of Japan had sperm packets from just one male giant squid embedded in her body, which surprised researchers who thought giant squids were promiscuous but now appear to be monogamous. Sounds like the plot for a monster rom-com called “Kraken in Love.”

The post Kraken’s Love Life, Deadly Starlinks, Doomsday Glacier and More Mysterious News Briefly — August 23, 2021 first appeared on Mysterious Universe.